Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Capitalizing on one's strengths


When it comes to photography, since I've been doing it for so long, I pretty much know my strengths and my weaknesses. And my temperament.

My technical side is sufficient to get me by, and I continue to learn.

What I'm particularly good at is seeing. I can find cool stuff in the weirdest places and can create something I think is artistically satisfying.

So wandering around in a boatyard a few days ago (giddy as an eight-year-old visiting Disneyland for the first time), I found a few bits of rusty, scratched, weathered, sanded, abraded, painted, and faded boat hulls, railings, doors,  and dumpsters to zoom in on.

I hereby inflict my bizarre proclivities upon you.

"Blue Boulders, Red Sea" is something I found on a railing. I don't know what made the rounded forms, but mine is not to question why . . . All I knew was that it was colorful, weird, and that I should keep my horizon line low.

And then I especially liked the rakish angle of the gouged metal in "Sail on a Rusty Sea." Again, low horizon line, very strong diagonality going on, and the look and feel of a sailboat heeling over.

Texture as metaphor. Texture that perhaps looks like something else. That conjures up images that are one thing, yet maybe another. Just another way of seeing. And thinking.

 ©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.



Tuesday, September 27, 2016

More boats . . .



I've shown and captioned these on Facebook, but thought I'd also put them here, just for the record.

Our first morning in Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia, and Chris and I are in just the right spot to see the "Harbour Mist" enter the harbour to offload mackerel, mackerel destined to be lobster bait.

Then toward the end of our trip, in deep fog heading toward Cape Forchu Lighthouose in Yarmouth, cool stuff loomed out of the mist -- big piles of lobster traps and, just up the road, fishing boats.

CJ spotted this "Lady Carol" buoy behind a stack of lobster traps and called me over to shoot it. Just up the road, I found the boat it belonged to. And Chris was heard muttering, "That's no lady, that's my wife!"

 ©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

It came out of the swamp . . .

More "boatyard art," this time from a vessel that had paint peeling off of it as well as some partially finished sanding. The trick to finding things like this is to look for an "eye." Once you have an eye, you just might find you have a strange creature. All you have to do is look...

©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Around the island . . .

Coupeville's famous red wharf on Whidbey Island, Washington a few days ago. Early morning, bright sunshine, wonderful reflections. A good start to the day.

©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Latest work: "Mrs. LaBan Collage"

Mrs. LaBan of Nelson, British Columbia, Canada, was apparently the owner (at one time) of this battered, weather- and water-damaged book I bought at an antique store on Whidbey Island, Washington.

The book was a mess — falling apart, moldy, and torn. I removed one of the first pages, where she had signed her name, and used it as the basis of my collage. I added some painted marks, a cancellation stamp, and a red Canadian stamp to the mix.

 ©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Found in a boatyard . . .

Ring-eyed Hullsider. Scientific name: Oculocirculus maritimus. Found on a boat being refinished at a boatyard today. Very rare. Obviously male.

©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Cartoonlike cuteness . . .

Just a quick little cellphone shot of a dory moored off the town of Shelburne, Nova Scotia. These boats are just too cute!

©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Latest Work: "Harvest Moon"

A big Harvest Moon rises behind pine trees with a blue sky behind and a luminous, mysterious patch of blue below. I used a variety of photographs to create this, including trees that I photographed at sunset near Mendocino, California, a stained piece of old paper, and the moon is a photo I took of a metal locker tag. I love how everything came together, creating an eerie, yet calming moonrise.

 ©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Suspiciously familiar . . .




Nova Scotia is a nautical place. It's not considered part of "The Maritimes" for nothing. Luckily, I'm a "maritime" kinda gal. Navy brat, coastal affiliations with California, Oregon, and Washington. And I live on an island.

So Nova Scotia looks suspiciously like "home." Even our latitudes are the same. Halifax is at 48 degrees, 38 minutes. Whidbey Island is at 48 degrees, 35 minutes. You do the math.

Other than driving kilometers, temperatures read in Celsius, and that glorious red maple leaf flag, I hesitate to say, IT WAS JUST LIKE HOME.

Well, not exactly, but pretty darned close. So close I could talk about Dungeness crab season to a lobster fisherman, both of us then realizing that our crabbing/lobster seasons begin and end around the same times.

What's particularly cool about Nova Scotia is that there's so much charm packed into a relatively small space. And, as you find in coastal Maine, there are lots of little peninsulas to drive up and down and around, never knowing what sort of weather you'll encounter, what boats might be out and about, and what the light will be doing.

So you're constantly surprised. What? No boats here at all? What? It's pouring down rain! What? It's sunny? What? It's hot and humid? In September? You gotta be kidding.

We had it all. Fog, sun, heat, coolness, rain, boring light, and wonderful light. Never did wear the two sweaters I brought. Wish I'd packed shorts. Or at least a short-sleeved shirt.

So here's my first glimpse of Nova Scotia. Lots of harbor harbour exploration, lots of boats, lots of sunshine. Lots of fun.

And you know what I regret? When renting the car, filling out the forms, I wish I'd said to the agent, "And you all drive on the left side of the road, right?" Just to see his expression.

Technical stuff: For this trip I brought two Canon camera bodies, one with a cropped sensor, the other full-frame. I brought a 24-85mm lens for the full-frame body and a 70-200mm "L" lens for the cropped sensor body. Never did use the fast 50mm lens I brought, nor the 12mm extension tube.

 ©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.





Monday, September 12, 2016

On this date in 2010 . . .


Hard to believe that it was six years ago today that I was beginning my Oregon coast photo workshop with a wonderful group of people, including my three buddies from North Carolina: Gisela, Jill, and June; Pat from San Diego and Betty from Fortuna; and Anne and Roy from southern California.

Fond memories, and we are all still in touch. How lucky am I?

©Carol Leigh
All text, photographs, and other media are ©Copyright Carol Leigh (or others when indicated) and are not in the public domain and may not be used on websites, blogs, or in other media without advance permission from Carol Leigh.